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Growing A Dog Friendly Garden

For those of us who love our four-legged friends, it can be hard to reconcile their rambunctious, digging ways with maintaining a beautifully landscaped garden. But it’s not impossible! At the same time, it’s very important to avoid plants and flowers that can be dangerous, even deadly, to our fur friends.

The key to growing a dog friendly garden is to train your dog and do a little homework. Since we can’t help you with the first part of that statement, we’ll give you what you need for the second part!

Potty Train With Purpose

If you’re lucky enough to be starting with a puppy or younger dog, you can leverage a true fact about dogs: they don’t like to mess where they live. That’s the foundation behind crate training, and it can be extended to the garden too. Designate a certain patch of grass as the ‘potty zone’. As you are training your dog, always, always, always take them to that spot. Consistency with training is everything and there are a couple of advantages to taking the time to get this done right:

  1. You will avoid yellow spots of dead grass due to dog urine ALL over your lawn.
  2. You will know exactly where to go to pick up to pick up the little bombs that doggo has left behind, before the yard can be enjoyed by everyone.
  3. Your dog will learn quickly, if you are consistent, that this is the place to go.

If you’ve already got burnt grass from pet urine damage, check out this earlier post on how to manage the damage!

Supervise All Yard Play

Particularly while your dog is still learning where they can play, and where they can’t, make sure they aren’t left alone in the yard. You can’t train them to not dig holes in the middle of your recently sodded green space or in the raised garden beds if you aren’t there to see them attempt it! Like sneaky toddlers, they’ll test the limits of what they can and can’t do, so consistency is important here too.

Part of a dog’s natural personality is to get into trouble when they’re bored, so ensuring that they get plenty of exercise through walks and play makes it less likely that they’ll try and burn off extra energy by digging holes!

Protect The Parts You Particularly Care For

If there are parts of your garden that you really want to keep safe from digging paws, consider putting up a decorative fence, at least for the early days, while your dog is learning. It doesn’t have to be taller than them: even a low fence will stop most dogs and it makes a visual reminder as you train the dog, that they can’t pass that fence!

You can also use plants on your garden borders that are fairly sturdy and give the appearance, at least from doggo’s point of view, of being a fence. Other options? Consider larger rocks or pieces of elegant driftwood to block the way. Container gardens are also a good way to keep your favourite blooms safe from digging paws.

Beyond protecting some features, it’s also important for your dog to be safe. Water features could be problematic with a small puppy, if they were to fall in. Consider all the elements of your garden from their height and age.

Have Some Toys Ready

Just like kids have indoor and outdoor toys, it’s a good idea to have a few outdoor ones handy for the furkids. They might get bored watching you pull weeds, so some toys or a ball you can throw between pulling clumps is a good idea!

Garden Elements To Avoid

If you’re using mulch, avoid any brand based from cocoa bean hulls. These contain the same chemical as chocolate—theobromine—which is deadly if your dog eats it. As to plants and shrubs, here’s a list of some of the more common ones that are found in local Mississauga gardens but which are toxic to dogs, if ingested.

Common yet dangerous plants for dogs:

If you love these, consider planting them at the front of your house, where your dog doesn’t necessarily roam free.

  1. Iris
  2. Ivy
  3. Autumn Crocus
  4. Hydrangea
  5. Azalea
  6. Daffodil
  7. Tulips
  8. Amaryllis
  9. Clematis
  10. Cyclamen
  11. Lily of the Valley

This list isn’t exhaustive but covers some of the more common plants you might be considering for your garden. If you want to see a full list, the ASPCA maintains one here, including the common and scientific names. As you’re making your list for your spring planting, if you’ve got a dog, cross reference it to make sure you’re keeping your fur friend safe!

The garden should be an oasis for the whole family, so don’t forget to provide your dog with fresh, clean water when they’re outside for a while—garden hose water can contain several toxins that aren’t good for humans or dogs—and make sure there’s a shady spot, so they can get out from under the sun. Most of all, enjoy your garden this season, with your WHOLE family.

March Break In Mississauga

Did you forget to book the kids into camp for March Break? Do you prefer to let them have real time off? Either way, you don’t want them staring at screens for seven days, so we’ve come up with a list of super fun things to do in Mississauga and the surrounding areas during the break!

Get Some Syrup

Terra Cotta Conservation Area is hosting its annual Maple Syrup Festival, with demonstrations on how delicious, sticky and sweet maple syrup is made, taffy on snow (a must have!) and pancakes! Each day features live entertainment, including the Four Paws Flying Dog Show and The Country Saw chainsaw carving! Get more details on their site and buy your tickets too.

The Bradley Museum is also featuring Maple Magic 2019, where visitors can learn all about traditional methods of syrup production, taught to early settlers by the Anishinaabe people. Take a tour with a guide, try some taffy and even pet some furry creatures at the petting zoo. Open from 12 – 4 p.m. every day of March Break, visit their site for more information and directions.

Downtime With Storytime

The libraries in Mississauga are offering some great free (some with very low fees) March Break activities for children, including:

  • Storytime with songs, rhymes and literacy activities.
  • A Peppa Pig party storytime.
  • Crafting events, including card making, 3D model painting, origami and more (some require pre-registration. See the link below!)
  • Board games and playoffs.
  • Performances of live magic, music, mad science, and even superhero training!
  • A family gardening workshop (we’re all for that one!)
  • Special activities for tweens (ages 9-12), including crafts, t-shirt stencilling and more.
  • And for older kids (11+): Photography class, video game challenges and more!

Check out the full list here!

Play All Day At Playdium

Can’t get away for the break? Playdium will make your kids feel like you’ve gone away to the most fun place on earth, if only for a day. With games, simulators and virtual reality, the 40,000 sq. foot complex is the indoor playground that your kids will thank you for taking them to for months to come! Special hours during March Break, opening at 10 a.m. every day, check out their site for details.

A Spectator Sport For All

If you and your family like hockey, March Break is a perfect time to catch the Mississauga Steelheads, playing at the Paramount Fine Foods Centre, in Mississauga. Games are currently scheduled for March 8, 12, 15 and 17. Click here for times and tickets and see you at centre ice!

If you’d rather actually be skating, the Skate on the Square will be open for March Break, daily from 10 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., weather permitting, with rentals and skate sharpening available.

Indoor Dinos?

Looking for a little indoor activity, combined with some shopping and a nibble at the food court? Erin Mills Town Centre is hosting Dino Days, from 12-4 p.m. daily March 11 – 15. Kids can experience today’s dinos with Reptilia Mobile Zoo, create a dino craft and take in some amazing displays.

Events On Specific Dates

March 12 — Splash ‘N Bubbles — Take a quick drive up to Brampton to the Rose Theatre and check out this hilarious duo from Treehouse TV. Sing, dance and jump to your heart’s content. If this one isn’t your cup of tea, there are a lot of other great events, all week at the Rose Theatre, including:

  • A Royal Tea Party with Anna, Elsa and Belle on March 13.
  • Live reading followed by the movie “Horton Hears a Who” on March 11.
  • LEGO workshop with Brick Labs on March 14.

March 13 — Popovich Comedy Pet Theatre, at the Living Arts Centre — with shows at 1 and 4 p.m., the whole family can be blown away by this fun show, featuring a cast that includes house cats, dogs, parrots and even geese! Get your tickets online and even meet some of the characters after the show!

March 13 — Youth Art Battle, at the Living Arts Centre — Artists 12 – 17 will battle to create the best art they can in 15 minutes! The viewing of the competition is an all ages event that is sure to inspire. To apply to be a part of the battle, click here.

As the winter weather eases, now is the perfect time to start planning your garden for spring, summer and fall, a family activity that everyone can get involved in. Encourage kids by offering them a section to plant what they’d like, however they’d like. It’s a great way to expose kids to the healthful benefits of getting outside and getting dirty!