When It Rains It Pours: Landscape Grading

The saying “when it rains it pours” took on a whole new meaning for many people on July 8th, 2013 including a number of our customers who had their basements flooded. It was incredible to see the amount of destruction that water could do in such a short period of time. One of our customers took a picture of a ravine near their backyard that had transformed into a raging river of 80 feet wide and 20 feet deep.

So that got us thinking of how we can help our customers weather the next rainstorm. One of the most important things in landscaping is the grading of your yard. We’ve combed through the web to bring you three articles that we think you will find useful to help you do landscape grading.

Lawn Drainage Systems – Read about landscaping professionals advice on drainage and grading issues in and around your yard. There is definitely some great advice that you can take action now.

DIY Grading – If you are thinking about grading your landscape yourself, this article gives you some useful tips on what to do. However, the image on how to grade your yard makes it easy.

Tips for Taming the Slope – If you are looking to transform your graded yard, here are some great ideas that will make your yard stand out.

For more information on landscape grading and other landscaping advice, you can contact us by email or by phone and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Streetscape Mississsauga Judging Underway

If you haven’t seen him (“the Gnome”) yet, you will soon enough! The Gnome and Streetscape Mississauga’s expert judges have been visiting various residential gardens all over the city in search of that winning garden. Here is an inside scoop of what the gnome and judges consider to be a potential winning garden.

Judges tend to favour more complex gardens with a mix of evergreens, shrubs, perennials and annuals, but there are always exceptions to every rule. Judges also look for gardens that are unique in some way that make it stand out from the rest.

As the judges come and visit your garden, you can simply avoid losing points by taking a couple of simple steps such as:

  1. Using artificial plant materials in the garden or in planters.
  2. Lack of maintenance such as uncut grass, no weeding and deadheading, poor pruning techniques, clutter or garbage left in the garden.

You also have to keep in mind that there is no such thing as a perfect garden because gardening is always changing. To manage pets, diesase, and better environmental friendly practices, chemical products used in the past are no longer considered to be an option. More gardeners today are incorporating environmental methods into their garden maintenance e.g. leaving grass clippings on the lawn; leaving seedheads on plants as a wildlife food source etc. In recognition of these issues, Streetscape judges will be more lenient when judging general maintenance, in the following ways:

  1. Gardens will not be penalised for spent flowers, fruit or leaves on the ground, unless they are diseased, as these are part of the natural garden cycle.
  2. So long as a lawn is generally healthy, some lawn weeds are acceptable. Weeds in flower beds are not.
  3. Spent flowers and seedheads may be left on plants if they have a decorative quality or if they provide a food source for wildlife. General deadheading will still be required.

What we are expecting is that you use judgement and common sense in maintaining your garden, without necessarily striving for a pristine appearance so Good luck and Good Gardening!!

For more information on Streetscape Mississauga, you can visi them here. For other advice on landscaping, please contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

How to Pick/Hire a Contatctor

It’s summer time. Say hello to warm weather and the perfect time to start that garden or landscaping DIY you have been meaning to do. For those home owners who are not confident enough to attack the project themselves; do your research. There are many contractors who claim to be able to do the job but many of us have heard horror stories of contractors who have done terrible jobs or even worse, those who have taken your money and did not complete the job, so consider these points before hiring a qualified contractor.

1. Ask for recommendations and references from friends and family
Start with friends and family that would have similar work done. This will also give you a chance to find out firsthand from an actual client how well a particular contractor performed and the work that they’ve completed. If a contractor you are considering has a good track record of happy clients, he will have no shortage of past customers who will be willing to give favorable testimonials.

2. Research your contractor(s)
It’s nice to rely on friends to give you leads, but you should also do your own research. You can check out many rating and review sites out on the web to see if you can find them and see what others have been saying about them. Also check to see if they have a website that gives you more information that rating and review sites. Information such as their areas of knowledge, process, before/after photographs, and customer testimonies. By having a web presence it may mean that they are legitimate business (eg. business license, insurance, WSIB, etc.) and you as a consumer may have recourse if things don’t go right.

3. Get bids and different quotes
Get at least 3 estimates or quotes in writing. A detailed quote listing labour costs, materials costs and time will help you understand what you’re paying for and help you compare the various bids. Everyone likes a good deal but if a quote comes in much lower than the others, that contractor most likely will be cutting corners somewhere or may incur additional charges midway through the project.

4. Check credentials and qualifications
Once you have decided on several candidates, the next step is to inquire about their license, as well as the insurance (liability and worker’s compensation) they carry. This is a very important step. By making sure everything is in order, you will greatly reduce the risk of any liability on your part if things go wrong with the construction project.

5. Be involved with the process
Think beyond the price and choose a contractor that you can trust to work closely with you
towards the realization of the project’s goals. Make sure you ask questions, understand the
scope of the project and what the contractor is doing. Stay on top of the project. When
something isn’t right, bring it up immediately.
Stay away from contractors who are uncommunicative or unaccommodating. This could be a lengthy process, so it would be in your best interest to hire one that you get a long with.

6. Get it in writing & payment
Every project should have a contract, no matter the size of the estimated work. Every detail about the project should be included in the contract- labour costs, description of the work, materials and work timetable. Protect yourself should a dispute arise.
Reputable contractors also do not demand for all the payment up front. If a contractor insists that you pay a large deposit or the total bill before the work even starts, this may not be a good contractor. Make periodic payments as the contract completes certain portions of the projects and reserve a significant amount to be paid only when the job is completed to your satisfaction.

We can recommend a contractor called Interlocking Plus. Or if you are looking for more advice on selecting a interlocking contractor, please contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Garden Walls: A Primer

A well-designed landscape can be inspiring, consider creating visual interest by adding garden walls. Changing the heights in your garden is one sure way to improve curb appeal on a once boring, flat yard. A low retaining wall or garden wall might be just what your landscape needs.

Concrete vs Stone walls?

The difference between the |”look and feel” concrete versus stone walls has become more indistinguishable as technology continues to evolve in concrete forming. Here is a list of pros and cons for both concrete and natural stone walls.

Concrete Walls

Modern concrete walls are not the ones you think of in cold, commercial plazas. They have much improved over the years and come in a variety of shapes, textures and colours allowing it to blend in well with the yard, garden and the exterior of the house.

Pros

  1. Lightweight – Machinery is usually not necessary when installing concrete garden walls, most attempting this DIY project are able to lift one or two blocks at the same time. Concrete products are usually compact and easy to work with.
  2. Quick and easy install – The integral lip or tongue-and-groove system interlocks the blocks and makes the installation fast and easy. You simply drop the blocks in place. Just be sure to stagger the vertical joints between rows.
  3. Versatile design – The shapes that this material comes in allows for curves in the design and much more versatile than stone.
  4. Inexpensive – The cost to make a garden wall out of concrete is less expensive than using natural stone and is widely available at home centers.

Cons

  1. Requires a strong and level base – Leveling a concrete garden wall requires more tedious leveling, it is imperative that your base (4 to 6”) is perfectly level before installing. We do not want the wall to shift. Unfortunately, this means more digging and base material required.
  2. Cutting with a saw – Cutting is required when installing a concrete garden wall. A special saw is required to cut these materials during installation.

Stone Walls

Natural stone (Armour Stone/rock) of different shapes and sizes fit tightly together when stacked to form a wall. Stones create the nicest-looking walls but are more costly and it will take much more skill and creativity to build as they are also much heavier.

Pros

  1. Less time is spent on the base when installing Armour Rock because most rocks are not perfectly level to begin with, most applications do not need tedious leveling.
  2. Strength – Strength is one of the biggest reasons why a natural stone wall built out of Armour Rock is a terrific option for a garden wall, the sheer weight of an individual rock will make it next to impossible to shift or move.
  3. Best-looking – Natural Stone is currently the trendiest option for landscaping; it offers great curb appeal to all homes. With increased competition within the industry natural stone is more affordable than ever before.

Cons

  1. Too heavy – Weight is a problem when using Armour Rock, most of the time a machine (skid steer) is used when installing Armour Rock.
  2. It is much more difficult to install Armour Rock on a tight radius, most of the time you are limited to straight/linear designs.
  3. Harder to work with – Stacking Armour Rock is difficult because of the various heights, skill and experience is important when selecting specific Armour Rock.

The finished product looks complicated but is a fairly simple project. Be sure to do your research. Regardless of the material you choose to build your new garden wall, with a little planning and effort, you will soon have a new focal point in your yard and a new home for your flowers and plants.

For more free landscaping advice, please contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Soil Preparation for Gardens and Lawns

Good news fellow green thumbers, it’s time to get your gardening tools and gloves ready for spring! As we slowly enter into April, the snow melts into the ground and the cold winters break into longer, warmer days; many of us become eager to start planting in our gardens but it is important to care for the soil at this stage by adding back important nutrients and improving texture so that healthy plants can flourish.

Here’s a checklist to get your soil preparation for gardens and lawns started:

1. When can we start digging? Check the soil conditions.

A mistake that many make is working on the soil too early. Allow the melting snow and spring rain to pass and the earth to dry out a bit before attempting to do any work. Heavy, wet soil is difficult to work with and doesn’t break up into loose, plant-friendly texture. Also, treading across wet ground will further compact the soil making it much more difficult to dig up later.

Is the soil dry enough? Do a quick test!
Squeeze a handful of soil and form a ball in your hands. If the lump of soil shatters easily when given a tap, it is ready! If the lump keeps its shape or breaks apart in solid sections, it still contains too much water and you must let it dry out some more. Clay soil, the type commonly found in Mississauga, when too wet will feel slick when rubbed between the fingers.

2. Clearing the area

Springtime is often associated with new birth and green growth, but as the white snow melts, we are often left with areas of debris, rocks and twigs. These need to be cleared away. A spade or a hoe is a handy tool to have.

3. Dig deep and loosen the soil

Don’t make the common mistake by using lousy soil. Plant roots grow below the ground so remember to dig deep! It is best to work soil 10 to 12 inches deep.

4. Adding organic matter

Lay the organic matter on top of the loosened, prepared soil and work the material thoroughly into the soil with a spade or a fork. Make sure it is even distributed. You can’t change the soil you have but adding organic matter drastically improves the overall soil quality.

Organic matter improves the soil by:

  • It helps loosen and aerate clay soil
  • It improves the water – and nutrient-holding capacity of sandy soil

Add lots of organic matter such as:

  • compost
  • manure
  • peat moss
  • grass clippings
  • aged sawdust
  • Spring soil preparations maybe hard and tedious work but it can save you untold disappointments and ensure you give your new plants and seedlings the best nutritious soil to grow and thrive in.

    For more free landscaping advice, please contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Planning a Garden Landscape

Every year around this time while putting away the last of the Christmas decorations, I secretly hope that spring will be just around the corner – the smell of fresh grass, colourful flowers in bloom and warm sunny days – sadly I know the worst of the cold is still to come as February is really, just around the corner.

Since spring is still months away and is blistery cold outside, what better way to pass the time than to make your daydreams into reality by planning out your garden.

Whether you like fragrant flowers, lash green shrubs or bountiful vegetable gardens; planning the foundation is essential.

Research is Key

Start by gathering ideas from magazines, the internet and visit home shows (International Home and Garden Show at the end of February and the National Home Show in the middle of March) to see what you like. Research is key, especially when you consider that a fixed object in landscape isn’t going to be move easily, such as driveways or large trees.

How is this space going to be used?

Decide what you want and need. What are your priorities? Is it entertaining friends, playing with the kids, growing flowers and vegetables, or simply relaxing in a hammock? How much maintenance are you willing to do?

Keep in mind of your budget constraints.

Also remember that the landscape may have to develop in stages. Make a map of your property. Draw a “bird’s eye view” to scale on graph paper. Be sure to include:

  • The house itself
  • Boundaries, noting the neighbor’s landscape style as well
  • Existing plants
  • Exposure (which way does it face – north, south, east, or west)
  • Utilities (dryer vents, air conditioner/heat pumps)
  • Service areas (dog kennel, storage building, trash cans)
  • Views you wish to preserve or hide
  • Downspouts and drains
  • Grades/slopes/drainage
  • Any existing irrigation systems
overview-of-garden-landscape

Use tracing paper or graph paper to draw your ideas. These could include plants, a gazebo, a walkway, an orchard, a pond, or sculpture. Lay the tracing paper over the map to get an idea of how the new landscape will look.

Here’s a helpful program from Better Home and Gardens to help you with laying out your design. This program is called Plan-a-Garden. It lets you design anything from a patio-side container garden to your whole yard. Use your mouse to “drag-and-drop” more than 150 trees, shrubs, and flowers. Add dozens of structures like buildings, sheds, fences, decks — even a pond. You will need to register to use the program and it is completely free!

Careful planning and sourcing will make the task much easier when springtime rolls in and the warm sun comes out. With planning out of the way, you’ll have all the time to run around outside and enjoy the new season with the family.

For more information, please contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Image Source: Freshome Design and Architecture

Burning Firewood Guide – Fireplaces and Wood Stoves

Nothing fills the house with smells and warmth like the crackling of a burning fire. Wood-burning fireplaces can creative a peaceful, inviting ambiance as well as an alternative way to heat your home.

Choosing the type of firewood to use can be a daunting task, so here is a quick guide to selecting the best firewood to use to get the best burning firewood experience. Arm yourself with some key information to help you be on your way to picking the right kind of firewood for you.

1. Always pick a seasoned firewood

Freshly chopped or unseasoned (green) wood has up to 50% water content and burning this will only result in a room full of smoke. Seasoned wood on the other hand have been cut, split and properly dried out for over a year allowing the moisture in the wood to evaporate.

2. What is the difference between hardwood and softwood?

Wood Type Type of Trees Positive Negative
Hardwood maple, oak, ash, birch, fruit trees burns hotter and longer, uses less firewood more expensive, harder to split
Softwood pine, balsam, spruce, alder, poplar easy to ignite, easy to split creosote build-up (cause chimney fires), highly flammable, burns out quickly

3. How does wood burn?

In the first stage, wood is heated to the point where moisture within the wood cells is driven off and the cells are drying out. As the wood is losing moisture, it is chemically changing into charcoal – which is famous for its volatile gases and liquids. Stopping the process at this point is where the charcoal industry packages their products.

The second stage is where actual flames burn off the volatile gases and volatile liquids to the point where charcoal has lost most of these volatile fuels. Much of the energy of wood fuel is lost during this stage.

Finally, the third stage occurs when the charcoal burns and can be seen when the embers glow. This is called “coaling”. At this point, heat is radiated from the burning bed of coals. Different species of wood burn and expend energy differently throughout these three stages.

4. What do I look for when buying firewood?

The burning properties and the heating potential of wood depend upon its species and density of that wood. Here are three heating values to consider when buying firewood – density, heat content and coaling quality.

  • Density – Denser wood contains more heat per volume
  • BTU – The higher the value, the more heat you get per unit of wood
  • Coaling – Wood that forms coals allow a fire to burn longer
Tree Species Density (lbs/cu.ft) Million BTUs/cord Coaling Characteristics
White Birch (Hardwood) 42 20.8 good Birch gives off good heat but tends to be consumed pretty quickly. The flavor is good, similar to maple which compliments pork and poultry nicely.
Beechwood (Hardwood) 32 to 56 24 to 27 excellent This has some great heat and flame but tends to give off a fair amount of sparks. Use a fireplace screen or door.
Pine (Softwood) 22 to 31 15 poor This burns well when well- seasoned but has a tendency to crackle and pop because it is resinous and a softwood. Good for kindling since it lights easily but too much can leave a strong piney smell which is nice outdoors but can be overwhelming indoors or with food. Can also leave an oily soot in your chimney and your food.
Spruce (Softwood) 25 to 44 15.5 poor Burns too quickly, produces low heat, can be smokey and with too many sparks. It is good to start fires with, but substitute with a hardwood.
Poplar (Softwood) 22 to 31 16 fair Not recommended – even when very well seasoned it burns poorly and produces an unpleasant black smoke.

Remember, part of having a memorable fireplace experience is having the right type of fire wood – choose a quality hardwood that have been proper aged

A Fun Way to Remember your Firewood

Here’s a fun rhyme to help you to remember:

These hardwoods burn well and slowly,
Ash, beech, hawthorn oak and holly.
Softwoods flare up quick and fine,
Birch, fir, hazel, larch and pine.
Elm and willow you’ll regret,
Chestnut green and sycamore wet.

For more information, please contact us and we will be more than happy to help you out.

Image Source: Flickr

Protecting your Interlocking Pavers – Tips on using a sealer

protecting-interlocking-pavers-using-a-sealer

If your neighbor is able to keep his driveway or patio looking brand new and vibrant, chances are he has used a Paving Stone Sealer. Paving Stone Sealers minimize or eliminate the porosity of most stone. If the stone is left unsealed, it will be most certainly be prone to certain types of damage such as
oil, salt, rust, harsh pool chemicals, colour fading from UV rays, dirt, and even autocare products.

Although applying the paving stone sealer isn’t difficult, having the right equipment to do it makes it simpler and easier to manage. Here is a list of the most essential and necessary equipment:

  • Paint Roller (thick nap) or Pump Sprayer
  • Rubber Gloves (throw away)
  • Goggles (you really don’t want this stuff in your eyes)
  • Work Pants (don’t care if you get sealer on it)
  • Work Boots (if you get this stuff on your sneakers, they will be ruined)
  • Pressure washer or hose with nozzle

In addition to having the right equipment for the job, here are some professional tips before applying, applying and using the paving stone sealer to keep that fresh and new look for your interlocking stones:

1. Remove all oil, grease, dirt

You can use the proper cleaners or use a power washer/hose with nozzle and allow the surface to dry for 24 hours before applying the sealer. If you are using a power washer, keep the angle at a shallow angle to minimize the loss of joint sand.

2. Removing efflorescence

Allow 30 to 60 days for the efflorescence (whitish salt) to escape from the stone. If the efflorescence is still visible, use efflorescence cleaner to remove it and let it dry 24-48 hours and then sweep the paving stones with a stiff bristled brush.

3. Keep water away

If you get water on the surface or on the roller while applying, a cloudy spot will form on the paving stone surface. If you sweat a lot, consider wearing a hat or headband to keep the sweat from dripping onto the sealer.

4. Watch the weather

Keep your eye on the weather as you do not want to apply the sealer below 10 degrees, or when there is a chance of rain (surface must be dry for at least 24 hours).

5. Increase durability

You can increase the durability of the surface when you apply the sealer in two thin coats than one thick coat. This will also reduce the possibility of the paving stone surface turning white.

6. Prevent streaking

For surfaces being sealed for the first time, apply a second coat by rolling in a cross direction than the first coat to prevent streaking. Allow first coat to dry prior to second coat application (drying time dependent on sealer brand). Allow sealed surfaces to dry for 24 hours before using. This will be more apparent on large flat surfaces such as flagstone.

6. Cleaning your tools

You must clean the tools immediately after the application. If you use a solvent-based sealer, use a lacquer thinner to clean the nozzle, canister and hose of your pump sprayer.

How to Install Interlocking Patio Pavers Tips – Part 2

If you missed part 1, of how to install interlocking patio pavers tips, you can click here.

Now that you’ve done your research, visualized your project, received free advice, determined your timeline and budget and possibly hired local help, its time to dig in and watch your dream landscape come to life.

Here are some additional tips that we think will help you to keep your project moving forward:

1. Keep your sketch or drawing close by

You’ve spent all that effort to visualizing your dream landscape, make sure you have it handy so that everything goes to plan. Better yet, make photocopies or scan your plan just in case it gets lost, waterlogged, ripped, eaten by the dog, or even buried (yeah, it has happened before!).

2. Getting the proper tools

You want to keep your significant other happy, get the rights tools so you can get the job done faster and better. Forget the snow shovel and go out and buy the right tool(s) or just rent them.

3. Stake it right

Make sure that when you stake out the dimensions of the project, it is important to keep your measurements consistent to your drawings to avoid shortage or overage of materials.

4. Keeping the edge straight

During installation you will need to use string between the stakes as a guide to help keep your interlocking pavers straight. If you want your pavers to stay straight for many years to come, think of installing landscape edging.

5. Tamping the sand

After you have applied the polymeric sand with a broom, use a tamper with a rubber pad to ensure that the sand fills in all the cracks properly. Once the polymeric sand activates, you are going to get a strong cohesive surface that will resist weeds and keep your landscape looking pristine.

6. More free landscaping advice

Just because you’ve started work, it doesn’t mean that you can’t still ask for advice. This is especially true if you encountered something unexpected like a large tree root. It won’t cost you anything and it may save you heartache and frustration down the road.

7. Don’t stop unnecessarily

Place your sand, gravel and stone in piles along the project perimeter so you don’t need to stop when you run out. This will help you keep focus on getting the project done. Don’t forget to cover the piles overnight to protect the sand from the rain.

8. Using a stone cutter

If you want smooth cut curve for your interlocking stone, rent a stone cutter or take it to your local garden centre to get cut it for you.

9. Keeping the help happy

If you’ve decided that you want to hire labour, save time and money by providing food and snacks so your help can stay onsite and help you finish your project faster.

How to Install Interlocking Patio Pavers Tips – Part 1

Interlocking pavers is probably one of the most cost effective and aesthetically pleasing products on the marketplace to add value to your property. The myriad of colors, shapes, sizes from a multitude of manufacturers will allow you to create the spectacular patio, walkway, terrace, or driveway that you dreamed of while adding value to your home.

As with any DIY project, installing interlocking pavers requires a bit of patience, time and elbow grease to come up with the finished look that you want. Here are some guidelines on how to prepare for the installation of interlocking pavers.

1. Research Interlocking Pavers and Materials

This is probably one of the most important parts of installing interlocking pavers. Good solid research will make your project a relatively smooth one. Here are some key questions you need to ask yourself:

  • What do you want to do or accomplish or build and where do you want to build it? (e.g. pathway, terrace, patio, driveway, etc.)
  • Ask for product catalogs and pricing sheets
  • Visit the interlocking paver manufacturer’s website or visit our showroom or check out their picture gallery for ideas on things can be done.
  • Ask questions to help understand the myriad of options and choices available such as mixing and matching stones from different manufacturers to create that unique look.

2. Draw and Sketch Your Landscape Vision

You don’t have to be a graphic artist to help you visualize your dream landscape. Roughly drawing your landscape layout will help you gather your thoughts and guide you through to the end of your project. By having your vision articulated on paper, you can always easily fine-tune your project with an eraser and pencil. You can start now by downloading this graph paper and sketch away.

3. Taking Measurements

Measure the perimeter (sides) of the project. There are two approaches to measuring out the project.

  • First method – use your garden hose to mark the area where the interlocking stone will be laid down. It is not the most accurate, but it does give you a good idea of how much square footage is being used.
  • Second method – use wooden stakes and string and precisely mark out the area and then measure with a measuring tape.

With the second method, you eliminate the need to stake out the area again when you start digging, thus saving you some time and effort later on.

4. Smart Budgeting

Understanding how much want to spend and sticking with it will give you great satisfaction when you finish. There are typically 3 types of expenses you need budget or account for:

  • Variable Expenses – These expenses are typically related specifically with the quantity, type, size, and color of the interlocking paver.
  • Fixed Expenses – The expenses are the sand and gravel that you require to build a solid foundation. Regardless of what type of interlocking stone you decide to go with, you will typically have the same amount of sand and gravel.
  • Miscellaneous Expenses – These expenses are extraneous items that will help you complete the project such as renting equipment, bins for waste disposal, and accessories.

5. Free Landscaping Advice

It doesn’t hurt that once you’ve got your plans put together to get some free expert advice. Call us and we will help you fine tune your landscape project and provide a quotation on all the required materials.

6. Timing it Right

Once you have finalize your plans, make sure you block out enough time in your schedule (eg. 1 day for 4 weekends, 2 days for 2 weekends) to complete the job in a timely manner. Don’t schedule a project a few weeks before an event because time pressure may cause you to make costly mistakes. Always give yourself extra time to compensate for any unforeseen delays such as rainy days. Lastly, the key to timing is to estimate the pace that you want to work at.

7. Pre-ordering for Less Headaches

Placing your pre-order for materials is also important to making sure that you are off to a smooth start. Landscape materials such as interlocking stone typically require a 24 hour notice for delivery while bulk materials have a turnaround of 4-6 hours. Other items such as bin rentals or tool rentals require 4-6 hours’ notice to ensure that the items are available.

8. Hiring your Friends/Family

Getting your friends and/or family to help you with a part of the job or the entire job will allow you to complete the job faster and make it far more enjoyable.

9. Hiring Local Labour

If none of your friends and/or family can help you out, you can always find local help through your local classified ads (Kijiji or Craigslist). For example, you may need someone to help you dig out the dirt and remove it or move the sand and gravel for you from the driveway to the project area. Make sure that you do your due diligence on the individual(s) and provide right tools to get the job done correctly.

10. Giving Yourself a Break

If you are doing this yourself, remember to give yourself a break every few hours or so that you can last through the day and for the entire project. Have plenty of fluids like water and snacks close by so you grab them when you need them.

To start reading about Part 2 of installing interlocking pavers, go here